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19th Century Miscellany

Mostly interested in the long nineteenth century and I also love cats, hats, cakes and knitting. The slightly peevish looking lady in my profile pic is my great-grandmother Olive, photographed around the turn of the twentieth century.


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fiftysevenacademics:

Death Becomes Her: A Century of Mourning Attire, At the Metropolitan Museum of Art from October 21, 2014, through February 1, 2015. The exhibition explores the aesthetic development and cultural implications of mourning fashions of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Approximately 30 ensembles, many of which are being exhibited for the first time, reveal the impact of high-fashion standards on the sartorial dictates of bereavement rituals as they evolved over a century.

“The predominantly black palette of mourning dramatizes the evolution of period silhouettes and the increasing absorption of fashion ideals into this most codified of etiquettes,” said Harold Koda, Curator in Charge of The Costume Institute, who is curating the exhibition with Jessica Regan, Assistant Curator. “The veiled widow could elicit sympathy as well as predatory male advances. As a woman of sexual experience without marital constraints, she was often imagined as a potential threat to the social order.” (image sources: X X)



castlesandmanorhouses:

Neuschwanstein Castle (Schloss Neuschwanstein,  is a nineteenth-century Romanesque Revival palace  above the village of Hohenschwangau near Füssen in southwest Bavaria, Germany.

http://www.castlesandmanorhouses.com/

The palace was commissioned by King Ludwig II of Bavaria as a retreat and as an homage to Richard Wagner. The palace was intended as a personal refuge for the king, but it was opened to the paying public immediately after his death in 1886. Since then more than 61 million people have visited Neuschwanstein Castle. The palace has appeared prominently in several movies and was the inspiration for Disney’s Sleeping Beauty Castle.





neil-gaiman:

stefan-girl-olaua:

"Well meaning adults can easily destroy a child’s love of reading - do not discourage children from reading because you feel they’re reading the wrong thing. There is no such thing as the wrong thing to be reading and no bad fiction for kids." - Neil Gaiman

I remember the strange panic attack before I went on to give this speech: the conviction that I wouldn’t be able to read what I’d written, or speak in articulate sentences. I wound up talking (in my head at least I was talking) in a really slow and measured way, because I was not certain any of it would make sense, or that I’d be able to get through it.

Which I mention only because I get lots of messages in Tumblr asks, asking how I got to be so good at this, or how people can do things if they are scared or stressed or things are too hard. And the only answer I really have is, you do it anyway. But maybe you breathe and do it a bit slower than normally.


Tagged as: so true!,


"Peel was the heir to a vast cotton-spinning fortune (Hurd tells us he was worth £22 million in modern terms), and he built himself a luxurious but over-the-top country mansion at Drayton Manor in Staffordshire. (It was demolished when the family ran out of money and is now a theme park.) Peel never rid himself of his northern accent. The waspish diarist Charles Greville thought he looked like a fat shopkeeper, and noticed him greedily stuffing himself and cutting creams and jellies with a knife."

"Can he really have been that flawless?", a review of Douglas Hurd’s Robert Peel: A Biography| The Telegraph

——

"The waspish diarist Charles Greville thought he looked like a fat shopkeeper, and noticed him greedily stuffing himself and cutting creams and jellies with a knife." Oh Peel. Now I see where the Duke of Wellington was coming from when he said "I have no small talk, and Peel has no manners. ” 

(via theironduchess)

Disraeli used to send up Peel’s accent, in particular how he would “poot” a question and say “woonderful” instead of “wonderful”.  Peel’s family background may not have been genteel but as AN Wilson points out in The Victorians, accent snobbery and insistence on received pronunciation were largely mid-nineteenth century innovations.  In earlier decades it wasn’t unusual for upper class people to speak with regional accents. 

(via velvethatlady)

Diz was a total accent snob (he made fun of Gladstone’s accent too!) which is weird bc his own accent was apparently obnoxiously fussy—the only references I can find to it are reports that he managed to fit 3 syllables into business & 4 into parliament. D made some comment somewhere about the 15th Earl of Derby’s ‘Lancashire patois’…and Derby was one of his only friends! (To say nothing of the fact that, accent or not, Derby was certainly of a much higher social class than the faux-aristocrat mocking his speech…) though I think the oddest accent story is the fact that Lord John Russell apparently had a VERY archaic accent & pronounced cucumber ‘cowcumber’.

Basically I want to go back in time with a tape recorder and hear how people actually spoke in the 1840s.

(via hollenius)

Diz apparently talked in The Queen’s English (LOL!) except for his tendencies to pronounce business as bus-i-ness and parliament as par-l-i-ament (how even?). Gladstone’s boyhood in Liverpool, in the days before “scouse” had developed, lent to his speech a “Lancastrian burr" that allowed his critics to stress he was no gentlemen (x). Peel too had a distinct northern accent (either Lancashire or Stratffordshire) and reversed the vowel sounds of Received Pronunication’s put (“putt”) and the first syllable of wonderful (“woonderful”) and had trouble with h’s. (Does Accent Matter?, p. 24)

Lord John Russell’s accent sounds like the “Cavendish Drawl”, also known as the “Devonshire House accent” after the Duke of Devonshire’s family whence it originated. The glamorous Whig hostess Georgiana Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire, made the accent popular among the foppish young aristocrats who formed the Devonshire House circle, many of whom later entered Parliament as Whigs and became Liberals in the Victorian era. Cavendish influence in the Whig Party meant that many of those who sought to ingratiate themselves with the party affected the drawl as well, including the future Lord Melbourne, Queen Victoria’s beloved Prime Minister. Once, when asked if she was certain Melbourne was a true Whig, Queen Victoria replied that he must be because he pronounced “Rome as ‘room’ and gold as ‘goold’”.

Historian Amanda Foreman, in her biography of the Duchess, describes the Drawl as being “characterised as part baby-talk, part refined affection: hope was written and pronounced as ‘whop’; you became ‘oo’. Vowels were compressed and extended so that cucumber became ‘cowcumber’ yellow ‘yaller’, gold ‘goold’, and spoil rhymed with mile. Stresses fell on unexpected syllables, such as bal-cony instead of bal-cony and con-template. By the middle of the next century all Whigs would speak in the Drawl, transforming a family tradition into a symbol of political allegiance. ”

Leslie Mitchell gives a more extensive account in his book The Whig World: “They [the Whigs and Devonshire acolytes in general] pronounced English words is ways that set them apart: ‘Gold was goold, lilac layloc, bracelet brasslet, yellow was ialo or yaller, china cheyney, balcony bal-cony, sovereign suvereign, envelope was pronounced as in Frency, the h was dropped in hotel. Coffee was inexorably cawfee, governess was governess (the o as in of); a carriage was quite often a chariot.’ Even a change of politics brought no change in accent. When the French Revolution frightened Walter Spencer Stanhope into Pittism, he continued to pronounce London Lunnon, cucumber cowcumber and woman ’oman. Oddly enough, the contemporary pronunciation of Derbt is the last example of Whig influence on language.”

(via theironduchess)




"Peel was the heir to a vast cotton-spinning fortune (Hurd tells us he was worth £22 million in modern terms), and he built himself a luxurious but over-the-top country mansion at Drayton Manor in Staffordshire. (It was demolished when the family ran out of money and is now a theme park.) Peel never rid himself of his northern accent. The waspish diarist Charles Greville thought he looked like a fat shopkeeper, and noticed him greedily stuffing himself and cutting creams and jellies with a knife."

"Can he really have been that flawless?", a review of Douglas Hurd’s Robert Peel: A Biography| The Telegraph

——

"The waspish diarist Charles Greville thought he looked like a fat shopkeeper, and noticed him greedily stuffing himself and cutting creams and jellies with a knife." Oh Peel. Now I see where the Duke of Wellington was coming from when he said "I have no small talk, and Peel has no manners. ” 

(via theironduchess)

Disraeli used to send up Peel’s accent, in particular how he would “poot” a question and say “woonderful” instead of “wonderful”.  Peel’s family background may not have been genteel but as AN Wilson points out in The Victorians, accent snobbery and insistence on received pronunciation were largely mid-nineteenth century innovations.  In earlier decades it wasn’t unusual for upper class people to speak with regional accents. 



questionableadvice:

~ Modern Woman and How to Manage Her, Walter M. Gallichan, 1910





runnagaterampant:

landscapes of Armada 2






questionableadvice:

~ Hints on Common Politeness, D.C. Colesworthy, 1867


Tagged as: eh?,


lesleyannemcleod:

Charing Cross, looking up the Strand

from Ackermann’s Repository of Arts February 1811




slojnotak:

Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky - Ice in the Dnepr (1872)





signorapotato Asked:
The worst period fashion in your opinion?

My answer:

hms-terror:

skeleton-sapper-in-the-wire:

octoberchan:

gammaxray-9900:

octoberchan:

skeletalzergface:

skeleton-sapper-in-the-wire:

skeletalzergface:

skeleton-sapper-in-the-wire:

skeletalzergface:

skeleton-sapper-in-the-wire:

Modern men’s fashion.

Can we please go back to 1950’s and try to redo it?

*1650’s

*1710’s

BRING BACK HUSSARS

BRING BACK HUSSARS

BRING BACK HUSSARS

BRING BACK HUSSARS

Hussars were in the 1650s though

Siege of Vienna was 1658?

Yeah, but the style of armor and using the Leopard pelts stuck around until roughly the end of the 17th Century/start of the 18th.

Haha what’s so bad with modern men’s fashion?

I’m more into Edwardian era dress, myself. Sadly, trying to dress that way leads to people thinking you’re steampunk. Just the right mix of fancy with vaguely practical, for the looks I prefer. Or rather, I prefer the working man’s outfits: suspenders, button up shirt, slacks, and a nice hat. No fancy ties or jackets, necessarily.

suspenders are pretty classy too while accentuates manliness imo

especially if the man rolls his sleeves to his elbows. add casual / practical masculine look like “this is the dude that’s willing to get his hands dirty and work”, but heyyy maybe it’s just me

Yeah but doing that now makes you look poncy and you’re liable to get your ass beat for it.

Urgghhh, JUST BRING 1810S FASHION BACK!!!!!

Late Tudor.  Early 1830s.  1980s. 





Remember to protect black cats, and all cats for that matter this time of the year. 



fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Gustave Dore, illustrator/engraver working in woodcuts; super hot and creator of the definitive visual language for Paradise Lost, The Divine Comedy and Don Quixote.

…..and those revealing images of London life.




fuckyeahoscarwilde:

Happy Birthday Oscar Wilde!!

(Geez Constance, stop trying to steal the spotlight with your gigantic hats!)